Latina Equal Pay Day 2020

Much of this trafficking is hard to detect, as it is not usually visible to the public or governmental eye. In a recent article from the International Business Times, Latino immigrant students are falling behind in academic achievements and graduation rates compared to other students.

Regardless of their level of education, white men benefit from approximately similar wage premiums—just above 20 percent. Alternatively, Hispanic women who receive a high school diploma experience a wage gap that is about 10 log points lower than Hispanic women who dropped out before graduating high school. In contrast, the benefit of some college is marginal in closing the wage gap, and the benefits of a bachelor’s degree are even smaller.

Their advocacy for the vote grew out of their insistence that Spanish-Americans, as they called themselves, were equal citizens. At a moment when the land rights, religion, and language of Hispanics were under attack, they asserted that the suffrage movement needed to include them and their concerns. Spanish-speakers constituted more than half of the population of the state and held political power as voters. Their position as economically secure and politically connected Hispanic women made them a force to be reckoned with.

The following links are for resources specifically geared to the interests of Latina and Hispanic business women. Latinx women are twice as likely to develop depression as compared to Latinx men, white populations or African-American populations3. Research also indicates that employed Latinx women are more stressed than unemployed ones4.

The Hispanic population tends to be younger and earlier in their careers, and there is a “disproportionate representation” of Latinas in service jobs, which tend to be low paying. Providing access to a culturally appropriate community health worker during breast cancer screenings may impact elements of patient care and satisfaction among Hispanic/Latina women, Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers report in American Journal of Roentgenology. Given the rhetoric and policies promised under the Trump presidential campaign, the 2016 presidential election has been proposed as a significant stressor in the lives of US immigrants, their families, and their communities, with potentially uniquely acute effects on the US Latino population. We contribute to prior geographically focused research by evaluating the association of the 2016 presidential election with preterm births among Latina women using national data with an interrupted time series design that controlled for temporal variation that might otherwise lead to spurious findings. Our results suggest that the 2016 US presidential election was associated with an increase in preterm births among US Latina women.

We found level shifts but no slope changes starting in August 2016 for male and October 2016 for female preterm births to Latina women. The exposure coefficient for female births was 110.6 (95% CI, 61.6-159.6), implying 995 more preterm births (95% CI, ) than the that would have been expected based on preelection data. Together, we observed approximately 3.2% to 3.6% more preterm births to Latina women above expected levels of preterm births had the election not occurred. These prestressor patterns presumably reflect the population’s adaptation to an environment possibly interrupted by the stressor. Our theory assumes that the policy and regulatory environment of the Obama administration constituted, in part, the environment to which Latina women, among others, had adapted for nearly 8 years and that Trump promised to change if elected.

Latina Equal Pay Day, observed on Nov. 20th this year, is meant to put that gap on display. Something that could help is a minimum wage increase, which would benefit a large amount of Latina workers. The Economic Policy Institute estimates that if the minimum wage were increased to $12 per hour by 2020 – a proposal introduced in Congress that lawmakers ultimately didn’t take up – then more than 35 million workers would receive a raise. The majority of those workers are women, 4.2 million are Latinas, and over 38 percent of Latinos who would benefit are parents.

Latina Style Magazine

— While disparities for genetic cancer risk assessment for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer persist between Latina women and their non-Hispanic counterparts, in the United States, there are few culturally targeted interventions. Academics at the time said that the case raised all kinds of ethical and pedagogical issues. Krug’s case is arguably more complex from an academic standpoint, in that she promoted her fake identity as she was building her career as a tenured, full-time professor.

  • The American Immigrant Council's research states that in 2012 Latina immigrants from Mexico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic had the lowest education level when compared to other countries.
  • However, women had higher education rates than the Latino male immigrants, as shown in the American Immigration Council's chart.
  • For example, 6.2% of female immigrants in Mexico have bachelor's degrees as compared to the 5.0% of male immigrants in 2012.
  • 14% of the women immigrants from the Dominican Republic have bachelor's degrees compared to the 12% of Dominican men.
  • This organization acknowledges and aims to solve the issue of fear of deportation that plagues the Latina community and makes it fearful of reporting such crimes.

Hispanic women were also 30 percent less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than non-Hispanic white women. Hispanic American men and women generally have lower cancer rates than the non-Hispanic white population. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 32.2 percent of Latina women work in the service sector, compared with only 20 percent of white women, and service workers are almost 20 percent less likely to have either paid sick leave or retirement benefits. Latina-owned businesses are concentrated in the industries of health care at 20 percent, administrative services at 18 percent, retail at 10 percent, professional at 9 percent, and real estate at 6 percent.

And the more they assimilate to American traditions, the quality of their diets really deteriorate. Many Hispanic women have said that they more likely to take preventative action https://www.silversgreyaviary.com/the-secret-to-venezuela-girls/ for their families when it comes to heart health. However, they end up completely ignoring their own health in the process, and these acts of selflessness can become deadly.

The NHBA is dedicated to helping Hispanic undergraduate business students develop the real-world skills and relationships needed to launch successful professional careers. The posted mission of LBA is to, “To build economic wealth and opportunity for Latino and Latina Business Entrepreneurs.” Established in 1976, LBA is the largest organization in the U.S. representing and promoting the interests of Latino business owners. This is a membership-based organization that offers a comprehensive business directory of members from a diverse business population including financial, manufacturing, professional and technical industries. She has more than 25 years of experience in small business development and ran her own digital marketing firm. Diana Franco, the executive director of WE NYC, a city government program that provides support services for women entrepreneurs, says that an estimated 35%-40% of the more than 9,000 participants in the program since 2015 have been Hispanic.

Because Hispanic women still face limited benefits in terms of the wage gap for getting a college education after graduating from high school, just encouraging higher education will not resolve the gender wage gap. Mora and Dávila also find significant differences based on the generation of immigration. The wage gap between second-generation Hispanic workers and second-generation white workers is narrower than the gap between first-generation Hispanic and white workers.5 But beyond this drop from the first to the second generation, the gap doesn’t narrow further for later generations.

The Latina health educators implemented the AMIGAS curriculum with remarkable fidelity. Of all the activities outlined in the curriculum, 98% were independently rated as having been correctly implemented. The participants also gave health educators superior ratings for the manner in which they delivered the curriculum. To assess the efficacy of AMIGAS, we surveyed participants at baseline and at 3- and 6-month postintervention follow-ups. We collected data with the audio computer-assisted self-interviewing method, chosen to enhance confidentiality and participants’ comfort levels and to increase comprehension among women with low literacy.

Many are also face challenges due to language barriers and access to health care, which can make it difficult for them to prevent or treat heart-related conditions. In 2012, the poverty rate for Latina women overall was 27.9 percent, compared with the rate for non-Hispanic white women at 10.8 percent. Poverty rates for Latina women, at 27.9 percent, are close to triple those of white women, at 10.8 percent. The number of working-poor Latina women is more than double that of white women, at 13.58 percent, compared with 6.69 percent. According to a 2010 study, the median household wealth of single Latina women is $120, compared with single white women’s median household wealth of $41,500.

Today at her job as executive director of the Latino Victory Project she works to elect progressive Hispanics to political office. To conclude the study, 40 women were asked to watch the final film and complete a survey that assessed knowledge, attitudes, relatability and acceptability of the video. According to Hurtado de Mendoza, the results of the final film are promising. In coming up with ideas for an intervention, the team also had to account for the language barrier and a lower health literacy rate among Latina women in Washington, DC.

Age and family structure play important roles in women’s labor force participation, as well as employment opportunities. Among Hispanic Americans, country of origin also has a strong impact on labor force participation. In addition to overt wage discrimination, the explained portion of the wage gap is largely caused by structural barriers that reduce Latinas’ expected earnings.